Author Interview: Phyllis Moore

I had the great pleasure of interviewing Phyllis Moore, author of the Pegasus Colony. You will find links and further information about the novel below. But first, let’s find out what Phyllis had to say.

Do you have any strange writing habits (like writing in a lucky pair of socks? Or using a special pen?)

Phyllis_MooreI can write pretty much anywhere. I don’t need everything to be quiet. I can write in my head while I drive, at work when things are slow and people are talking, at the park, or in a coffee shop. And I can write when everything is turned off and silent.

When an idea comes. I write.

If I get stuck somewhere and have to sit with nothing to do or read, give me paper and pen, and I write.

That process sounds familiar. Is there a book you wish you had written?

I’ve thought about it and I don’t think there is a novel I wish I’d written.

There are authors like J.K. Rowling that I wish I was as well read.

It would be nice it my characters were so well known that when some one says, Jessica Hewitt or Nu Venia, people know who they are.

Pegasus Colony is my first novel. I have my future in front of me and I have goals to meet.

That’s certainly an admirable goal. If Pegasus Colony was adapted for the cinema screen, who would play your favorite characters in the movie?

May I tell you a story instead?

I have many friends who bought my book and laughingly asked when the movie was coming out. My first thought was, this is not movie material.

But the Bible says where two agree it will happen. So I agreed with every statement of my book becoming a movie.

I told my friends when the movie came out I’d rent a movie theater and invite all of them and their significant other. I’ll have a buffet at the front of the theater just under the screen for people to eat and visit before the viewing.

And yes, we laughed good-naturedly.

But …

A met a gentlemen who bought a book and whose his son is screenplay writer. He planned to have his son also read the book.

I haven’t heard from him as of yet, but you never know.

I’ll keep my fingers crossed. You mentioned a few names from the series. How important are names in your books? Do you choose based on the sound of the name, its meaning, or some other method?

From other books I’ve read, names are very important from names like Stephanie Plum to Sherlock Holmes to Romeo and Juliet to Albus Dumbledore.

Sometimes my characters change their names several times before I settle on the right one.

Sometimes I hear a name and have to use it. A friend’s middle name is Samard. I’m using his name for a king in one of my fantasy stories.

I have a running list of names that I’ve heard or made up that one day might become a great fictional character.

I like to use friends’ names too. And following on from the earlier theme. If you had an endless budget, describe the trailer for Pegasus Colony.

It would be spectacular.

If I had unlimited money I’d find creative people who know how to catch an audience eye and wanting them asking for more.

One thing I would not do is tell the whole story in the trailer like so many movies do today. It’s annoying. If I know the story and how it will turn out, why bother to go see the movie.

I want my trailer to be intriguing with just enough information to create a mystery that encourages people to buy my book because they want to know what happens.

I get that. Sometimes there are so many spoilers it reflects badly on the movie. But, moving on, can you list five adjectives to describe yourself or your writing habits.

Persistent. Committed. (These two maybe the same. The point is I don’t easily give up. I also don’t start something unless I plan to finish it. I may have to put the story to the side and let it mature for a bit, but I have plans to get back to it.)

Intriguing. (I like to create mystery so the reader wants to keep turning the page to see what happens.)

Misleading. (If you’ve read my short stories, you’ll know I like to lead the reader in one direction only to surprise them with an unexpected ending.)

My last adjective would be “Hone,” as in honing my skills.

I strive it to learn from my mistakes and to improve on what I’ve already written. I want each book to be better than the last.

I think that’s important, because we never stop honing our craft. Tell us about your next project.

I’m presently working on the second book of People of Akiane, Storm’s Coming. I originally wrote People of Akiane as one book, but it was too long, and it kept growing, so I turned it into a trilogy.

What has been your greatest challenge as a writer so far?

Becoming a great writer.

There are so many different elements of writing a novel such as: plot, characters, description, and dialogue.

I’m great at story and dialogue. If I could write a novel with only those two, I’d be happy, but I must also develop strong, interesting characters. I must give details that make the characters and their world seem real.

Yes, the characters are certainly key. Are there any other genres you would love to explore?

My trilogy is science fiction, but I also have a couple of fantasy ideas in the works.

I’d like to write humorous novels that seemingly goes nowhere, but in the end, it all lines up into a good laugh and “Wow that was great!”

My goal is to entertain readers. To take them out of this world and place them in an adventure in another world.

It’s the ultimate goal, isn’t it – taking our readers on a journey. I wish you every success. Thank you so much for agreeing to the interview, Phyllis. I had great fun chatting with you.


Connect with Phyllis Moore

My Blog: MythRider

https://mythrider.wordpress.com/

Facebook:

https://www.facebook.com/PhyllisMooresMyths

Web page: Moore’s Myths

http://www.mythriderpublishers.com/moores_myths.php

Pegasus Colony is available on Amazon, Barns & Noble, and iBooks.

CT001-PegasusColony-PhyllisMoorenewLt. Jessica M. Hewitt can’t find peace for her own life, yet her mission is to bring peace between two worlds 28 light-years apart. Her orders are to convince the rough Pegasus Colony that they are still an Earth colony.

Soon after she lands on the alien planet, her nonexistent negotiation skills immediately prove their worth, within seconds she’s failed. Their leader has walked out on her.

The colony wants nothing to do with their home planet. They’ve been on their own for over 300 years. They’re not about to give up their independence.

At last that’s what they say is the problem. But there’s something else going on.

Why has the Earth team has been exiled to the farther reaches of the colony habitat? Why are the colonists so secretive about one particular garden? What are they growing? And why will not one colonist speak to anyone from Earth.

Most importantly what will it take to convince the colonists to just speak to her? The answer to that question may cost Jessica her life.


Thank you for stopping by.

Mel

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